Coyote carcasses strung up from roadside tree in Virginia

Coyotes began colonizing Virginia in the late 1970s.

WEST AUGUSTA, Va. (AP) — Prowling coyotes have become so prevalent in rural Virginia that some residents are stringing up carcasses from tree branches at farms and ranches.

A resident of West Augusta has strung up a dozen dead coyotes from a roadside tree. An Associated Press photographer captured images of the swaying carcasses this week while traveling the back roads of the Shenandoah Valley.

State wildlife biologist Mark Fies says there are no population control benefits to stringing up dead coyotes. He says it’s possibly a holdover from the days when ranchers were paid bounties for each carcass. Fies believes it’s not a good idea to hang the dead critters in plain public view, saying it could upset some people.

Coyotes began colonizing Virginia in the late 1970s.