Gov. Baker: State Police superintendent “made a mistake and I wish him well”

McKeon has been in service for 35 years

Photo Courtesy: Massachusetts State Police

BOSTON (WWLP) – The State Police Superintendent Colonel Richard McKeon has resigned after 35 years of service. He submitted his letter of resignation to Public Safety Secretary Daniel Bennett Friday afternoon.

McKeon has been criticized recently for his alleged role in demanding a trooper change an arrest report in an incident involving a Massachusetts judge’s daughter.

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According to the letter written by Colonel McKeon to Secretary Bennet, the 35-year police veteran said in part:

I have today decided that putting the greater good of the Massachusetts State Police first, necessitates my decision to retire after 35 years of proud service. I am honored to have served as your Superintendent and grateful for the honor of working with you. I am also thankful to the Governor and the Secretary of Public Safety and Security for the privilege of serving in this position.

Giving up his role as colonel and superintendent, McKeon added that, “What has been lost in the headlines in recent days is another part of the unspoken code that we follow — to do our jobs with professionalism, compassion and empathy.”

A state trooper named Colonel McKeon in a lawsuit alleging he improperly ordered the trooper to delete embarrassing details from an arrest report for the daughter of a state trial court judge.

Gov. Baker appointed McKeon to lead the state police two years ago.

“Well, the colonel made pretty clear that this was his decision,” Gov. Baker told 22News. “From the beginning he was very up front about that. But, as I said, he made a mistake and I wish him well. The man did a terrific job serving the public for 35 years, and we should not forget that.”

Gov. Baker said he did not ask Colonel McKeon to retire. Colonel McKeon’s retirement becomes effective in one week, on November 17th.

In his letter to Secretary Bennett, McKeon also stated in part:

The lesson I learned early in my career, have lived by ever since, and have tried to impart to those I’ve had the privilege to command, is that you can do your job to protect the public safety while also understanding that even offenders are people who need to reclaim their lives and move on after they have paid their debt.

Colonel McKeon concluded his resignation letter thanking all who served alongside him.

“It had been a privilege to serve as your superintendent,” McKeon stated.

An announcement regarding his successor is expected in the coming days.

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