The Latest: Hurricane Irma

Updated track shows Irma heading for south Florida

(WWLP) – As Hurricane Irma’s track continues to shift eastward, an updated track shows the powerful storm heading near south Florida by late Sunday.

The Category 5 storm, which is the most powerful Atlantic Ocean hurricane in recorded history, made its first landfall early Wednesday morning. The National Weather Service said the eye of Hurricane Irma passed over Barbuda around 1:45 a.m.

Irma made landfall again later Wednesday morning as it passed over the island of St. Martin. Irma’s northern eyewall is impacting the island Anguilla as well Wednesday.

The updated track shows Hurricane Irma pulling away from northern Puerto Rico early Thursday morning, rather than making landfall. The island will still experience wind damage and heavy rains without a direct hit.

The powerful hurricane is expected to remain a Category 5 storm into Thursday afternoon, when it is expected to stay just north of the Dominican Republic and Haiti, before passing through the Turks and Caicos islands early Friday morning.

Hurricane Irma now a Category 5, efforts to prevent damages underway in Puerto Rico

Hurricane Irma should weaken to a Category 4 storm by early Saturday morning as it passes north of Cuba.

The latest track takes Irma near southern Florida between Sunday and Monday.

It is still early and the hurricane’s projected path could change before getting closer to the United States.

Below are Associated Press updates on Hurricane Irma

MIAMI (AP) — The Latest news related to Hurricane Irma in Florida (all times local):

1:45 p.m.

People in Florida are getting mixed messages on whether and when to evacuate ahead of Hurricane Irma.

Broward County has just ordered coastal evacuations, mandatory but with no enforcement, as is typical in Florida.

Miami Beach has advised evacuating, but not made it mandatory.

Miami-Dade County says it may start ordering evacuations today, but has not done so yet.

And Florida Gov. Rick Scott says anyone who intends to evacuate should “get out now.”

However, with a storm track forecast up the middle of the state, it is unclear to many people where they should go.

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12:50 p.m.

Help is already on its way to wherever Hurricane Irma does the most damage in Florida.

About 80 members of an elite search and rescue team from Virginia have been deployed to jump into the aftermath. Fairfax County’s Urban Search and Rescue Team, also known as Virginia Task Force 1, left Wednesday for Mobile, Alabama, where they will stage until they know where they’re needed. The team was activated by the Federal Emergency Management Administration and includes swift-water rescue specialists, canine units and other search-and-rescue resources.

Also preparing to respond are more than 100 Florida Forest Service personnel, using aircraft, off-road vehicles and mobile command posts to assist in any search and rescue missions, debris clearing, distribution of supplies and other aid. State Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam says help is ready but meanwhile, all Floridians should “complete their preparations and finalize their plans before it’s too late.”

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12:40 p.m.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott says the state is working to get gasoline to areas experiencing shortages in advance of Hurricane Irma.

Scott announced in Miami that he’s asked the governors of Alabama and Georgia to waive trucking regulations so tankers can get fuel into

He told residents of the Florida Keys that “we’re doing everything to get fuel to you as quickly as possible.” Tourists are under a mandatory evacuation order, which began Wednesday morning.

Residents will then be ordered to evacuate, but many gas stations across southern Florida are experiencing shortages.

Scott said, “we will get you out.” But he’s urging people to move quickly if they plan on evacuating, calling Irmaa “life-threatening storm.”

“Do not sit and wait for this storm to come,” Scott said. “Get out now.”

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12:30 p.m.

Federal Emergency Management Agency Director Brock Long says housing built after 2001 in Florida should by law have been built to withstand the winds of a Category 3 Hurricane. Irma is currently Category 5, much stronger than that, but Long says those building codes may at least help mitigate structural damage.

Long told “CBS This Morning” that is main concern right now is that people may have too much faith in the five-day forecast. He says he never puts a lot of confidence in these longer-term forecasts, because a hurricane can turn. He says “everybody needs to be monitoring this in the Gulf and up the East Coast and watching this very carefully.”

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12:15 p.m.

The National Weather Service director says his staff is “very worried about the impact of winds and surge on the Keys” as Hurricane Irma approaches.

Director Louis Uccellini says all the hazards will be dangerous with Irma — that means the storm surge, high winds and heavy rain.

He says “very strong winds can do a lot of damage” in an urban environment like South Florida.

The key for Florida and the U.S. east coast is when and where Irma makes a “right turn” and heads north. He says where that happens “depends on a low pressure system over the Great Lakes region.”

To figure all this out, the weather service is using its newest satellite and launching 49 new balloons to gather information for computer models.

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11:30 a.m.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott is activating an additional 900 members of the Florida National Guard to prepare for Hurricane Irma.

Scott called up the additional guard members on Wednesday, a day after he had activated an initial 100 members. During a stop in the Florida Keys, Scott said that he still plans to another 6,000 National Guard members report to duty on Friday.

The governor warned that Irma is “bigger, faster and stronger” than Hurricane Andrew. Andrew pummeled south Florida 25 years ago and wiped out entire neighborhoods due to its ferocious winds.

During his remarks Scott acknowledged that state officials were aware of fuel shortages and were trying to help get gas into the region. The Florida Highway Patrol accompanied gasoline trucks into the Florida Keys on Tuesday night.

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9:20 a.m.

Lawyers for a Florida man scheduled to be executed in October want a delay in last-minute court proceedings due to the threat of Hurricane Irma.

Attorney Martin McClain said in a motion filed Wednesday that he and other lawyers representing Michael Ray Lambrix live in the expected path of the Category 5 storm. He said the attorneys need time to help their families get ready. McClain in his motion said that the state is expected to oppose the delay.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott on Friday scheduled Lambrix’s execution for Oct. 5.

The 57-year-old Lambrix, also known as Cary Michael Lambrix, was convicted of the 1983 killings of Clarence Moore and Aleisha Bryant. Prosecutors say he killed them after an evening of drinking at his trailer near LaBelle, about 30 miles (48 kilometers) from Fort Myers.

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8:45 a.m.

Hurricane Irma has caused torn off rooftops and knocked out all electricity on the French islands of Saint Martin and Saint Barthelemy and France has requisitioned planes and sent in emergency food and water rations.

The regional authority for Guadeloupe and neighboring islands said in a statement Wednesday that the fire station in Saint Barthelemy is under 1 meter (more than 3 feet) of water and no rescue vehicles can move.

It said the government headquarters Saint Martin is partially destroyed and the island is in a total blackout.

Electricity is also partially down on the larger island of Guadeloupe, where the threat receded despite danger of heavy flooding.

French minister for overseas territories Annick Girardin expressed fear “for a certain number of our compatriots who unfortunately didn’t want to listen to the protection measures and go to more secure sites.”

She added: “We’re preparing for the worst.”

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7:50 a.m.

Key West International Airport is preparing to close as Hurricane Irma approaches the island chain.

Officials said in a news release that the airport will close Wednesday night due to the Transportation Security Administration’s security checkpoint ceasing the screening of passengers.

The final flight out of the Keys, Delta Flight 567, is scheduled to depart for Atlanta at 5:50 p.m. Monroe County spokeswoman Cammy Clark said in a news release that all commercial flights will then be canceled until further notice.

General aviation flights will continue from Key West and the Florida Keys Marathon International Airport until conditions become unsafe to operate. However international general aviation flights will end Wednesday afternoon when U.S. Customs and Border Protection ceases operations.

7:20 a.m.

President Donald Trump says his administration is closely watching Hurricane Irma.

On Twitter Wednesday morning, Trump says his “team, which has done, and is doing, such a good job in Texas, is already in Florida.” He adds: “No rest for the weary!”

In a subsequent statement on Twitter, Trump says “Hurricane looks like largest ever recorded in the Atlantic!”

Hurricane Irma is the most powerful Atlantic Ocean hurricane in recorded history. It made its first landfall in the islands of the northeast Caribbean early Wednesday.

It’s on a path toward Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Haiti and Cuba before possibly heading for Florida over the weekend.

Trump has declared emergencies in Florida, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

7:10 a.m.

Expect to wait in line for gasoline in South Florida — if you can find a station that still has gas.

Lines stretched around 50 cars deep at a gas station in Cooper City, which is southwest of Fort Lauderdale, by 5:30 a.m. Wednesday. The station had been out of fuel on Tuesday night, but received an overnight delivery.

Workers at a station in Doral, near Miami, put yellow caution tape around pumps Wednesday morning after running out of gasoline. Local news outlets reported both long lines and stations that had no gas across South Florida.

3:20 a.m.

Officials in the island chain south of the Florida mainland are expected to announce evacuations as Hurricane Irma moves west through the Caribbean toward the state.

Officials in the Florida Keys say they expect to announce a mandatory evacuation for visitors starting Wednesday and for residents starting Thursday.

The Category 5 hurricane is expected to reach Florida by the weekend. On Wednesday morning it was about 40 miles (65 kilometers) north of Antigua.

People in South Florida raided store shelves, buying up water and other hurricane supplies. Long lines formed at gas stations and people pulled shutters out of storage and put up plywood to protect their homes and businesses.

 

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