7 cases of Salmonella reported in Massachusetts

WASHINGTON (WTNH/WWLP) — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating a multi-state outbreak of salmonella connected to backyard poultry.

The outbreak is linked to seven cases of Salmonella in Massachusetts. Those seven cases are among 961 people in 48 states that have been sickened according to the CDC.

Web Extra: Case Count Map

2017 08 22 cdc salmonella outbreak map 9 cases of Salmonella reported in Connecticut
(Map: CDC.gov)

Of that number, 215 sickened people have been hospitalized, and one death has been reported. The most recent illness began on July 31, the CDC said in a statement Tuesday.

The full CDC report is available here.

Contact with live poultry or their environment can make people sick with Salmonella infections. Live poultry can be carrying Salmonella bacteria, but appear healthy and clean, with no sign of illness, the CDC wrote in their report.

Tips to reduce the odds of a Salmonella infection from backyard poultry:
(Source: CDC.gov)

  • Always wash your hands with soap and water right after touching live poultry or anything in the area where they live and roam.
    • Adults should supervise handwashing by young children.
    • Use hand sanitizer if soap and water are not readily available.
  • Don’t let live poultry inside the house, especially in areas where food or drink is prepared, served, or stored.
  • Don’t let children younger than 5 years, adults older than 65, or people with weakened immune systems from conditions such as cancer treatment, HIV/AIDS or organ transplants, handle or touch chicks, ducklings, or other live poultry.
  • Don’t eat or drink in the area where the birds live or roam.
  • Avoid kissing your birds or snuggling them, then touching your mouth.
  • Stay outdoors when cleaning any equipment or materials used to raise or care for live poultry, such as cages or feed or water containers.
  • Buy birds from hatcheries that participate in the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Poultry Improvement Plan (USDA-NPIP) U.S. voluntary Salmonella Monitoring Program. This program is intended to reduce the incidence of Salmonella in baby poultry in the hatchery, which helps prevent the spread of illness among poultry and people.