New devices help prevent distracted driving

Scott Tibbitts is working to reduce death as a result of distracted driving.

Tibbitts' answer is called Groove, a little device that plugs into your car underneath the steering wheel.

(CNN) – No matter how much you hear about the dangers of texting and driving it’s still tempting to grab for your phone while you’re behind the wheel. But some inventors are looking to end that temptation all together.

Scott Tibbitts of Boulder, Colorado is working to prevent families from ever getting the call that their loved ones died as a result of distracted driving. “I am over here a scientist and engineer but you know, scratch the surface. More than anything else, I am a father.”

Back in 2008, after Tibbitt’s arrived for a business meeting, he learned the person he was to meet with had been killed only hours earlier by a driver, who was allegedly texting behind the wheel.

“There is just this cathartic empathy for the tragedy of it and in the moment of that being a father and having just driven through the intersection. Then the entrepreneur kicks in. Wow, maybe there is a solution. Maybe there is an invention that could do this that will save a lot of lives.”

Tibbitts’ answer is called Groove, a little device that plugs into your car underneath the steering wheel. Groove alerts your mobile phone provider to hold all emails, texts and social networking updates and prevents you from sending messages and posting on social medial while driving.

“Just when you start driving you go into the super airplane mode. Where the things that would distract you go away. All of a sudden those things are not on the phone anymore.”

Jesse Hoggard, chief marketing officer for cell control, demonstrates his company’s answer to distracted driving; It’s called drive id.

Jesse Hoggard states “it is solar powered and it is mounted to the windshield of the car right underneath the rear view mirror. With that in place and our app on the phone or device we can restrict access to apps on the phone either through the entire vehicle or for just the driver.”

In 2014, more than 31-hundred people were killed, and 431-thousand were injured in motor vehicle crashes involving distracted drivers according to distraction.gov.

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