Presumptive presidential nominees could have a big impact on voter turnout

Clinton, Trump viewed unfavorably by large number of Americans

(AP file)

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (WWLP) – Democrat Hillary Clinton made history this week, becoming the first woman to be the presumptive presidential nominee for a major political party.

This comes about two weeks after Donald Trump was named the presumptive Republican nominee, both far surpassing the number of delegates needed to clinch the nomination. Now the candidates’ focus has shifted to attracting undecided voters. One group of sought-after voters are the large number of people who have supported Bernie Sanders in the Democratic primaries.

“The voters less likely to go out and vote in November are younger voters, and Bernie Sanders supporters are younger voters. Both candidates will court them, but it’s more than just getting them to the dance- it’s getting them on the dance floor. So they’re in play and they have the potential of having a significant impact if they go out and vote,” said State Representative Joseph Wagner (D-Chicopee).

Continuing Coverage: Decision 2016

 

Both presumptive nominees have been controversial and viewed unfavorably by many. Now, some voters are saying they won’t vote in the 2016 election at all because of those two candidates. If that were to happen, it could have a big effect on local government elections.

“There will be some people who are new to politics or at least new to paying attention to politics because their candidate, Bernie Sanders, wasn’t the nominee won’t vote – and I’m sure that some of them will also switch lines. But when it comes down to it, I think that most Republicans and most Democrats are going to stick to their party,” Wagner said.

The presidential candidates aren’t the only ones up for election. On November 8, western Massachusetts residents will vote for congressman, state senator and representative, governor’s councilor, county sheriff, and on ballot questions as well. There is no election for U.S. Senate in Massachusetts this year.

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