Keeping your plants healthy in storms

Wet plants can lead to the growth of mold, powdery mildew, fungal spores or black spots.

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (WWLP) – We already have had more rain fall over the past two weeks than normally falls the entire month of July. Some rain is good, but too much rain, and your grass and plants get waterlogged. All of this extra rain promotes disease and fungus in your garden.

Wet plants can lead to the growth of mold, powdery mildew, fungal spores or black spots. You can tell some plants are too wet if you start to see yellowing on the bottom of the leaves.

Still, despite the unseasonable wetness, there are things you can to make sure these damp conditions don’t ruin your lawn or garden.

Peter Furnari from 16 Acres Garden Center told 22News, “What you’ve got to try to do is try to break the surface of the soil around the plants, which would help it drain a little bit, or get a pitchfork and just poke some holes around the outside of the plant.”

Here are some other hints to keep in mind for your plants and lawn:

  • Remove weeds to allow for proper ventilation and cutting the dead heads off the plants will also help them recover.
  • Grass that stays wet for too long isn’t good either, as it could also lead to disease.
  • Aerating your lawn or using some fertilizer could help it stay fungus free.

For next time, be sure to cut your grass shorter before it rains so the blades don’t lie on top of each other. This could help it dry out faster and avoid growth of fungus.

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