Study: No link between MMR vaccine and autism

About 25% of parents concerned about possible link

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (WWLP) – In recent years, childhood vaccinations have become among the most controversial issues in medicine.

A study released in the early 1990′s suggested certain vaccines could potentially cause autism in children, but several studies have been done since then, attempting to prove the opposite.

About one quarter of parents express some concern about that potential link, and some choose to not have their children vaccinated.

But the latest study from the Journal of Pediatrics argues there is no evidence that the MMR, or measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, causes autism in children.

Pediatrician Dr. Michael Klatte told 22News that this latest publication confirms the numerous studies done in recent years that he says also disprove any link to autism. He says that researchers have reached these conclusions after surveying vast numbers of children.

“And in fact, ranging in the numbers of millions of children that they have looked at when you combine all of the studies together,” Klatte said.

Dr. Klatte also told 22News there are some minor side effects, like a low fever, particularly the d-tap vaccine, that protects against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis, more commonly known as whooping cough.

“Pertussis is extremely, extremely important as we’ve seen a rise in pertussis cases over the last few years, secondary to declining vaccination rates in children,” Dr. Klatte said.

Doctors warn that opting out of the recommended vaccine regimen in a child’s early years could potentially put them, their family, and the community at risk for the diseases the vaccines are intended to prevent.

Dr. Klatte advises parents to take a look at the vaccine recommendations and research published by the Centers for Disease Control, in order to decide what is best for their children and family.

Click here for a link to the state’s vaccine requirements for children entering the public schools.

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